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Wednesday 08 July, 2020 | RSS Feed

The Application of 100BASE-X SFPs Transceiver

by www.fiber-mart.com

In computer networking, Fast Ethernet is a collective term for a number of Ethernet standards that carry traffic at the nominal rate of 100 Mbit/s (the original Ethernet speed was 10 Mbit/s). Fast Ethernet is sometimes referred to as 100BASE-X, where "X" is a placeholder for the FX and TX variants. The standard specifies the use of CSMA/CD for media access control. A full-duplex mode is also specified and in practice all modern networks use Ethernet switches and operate in full-duplex mode.
 
The "100" in the media type designation refers to the transmission speed of 100 Mbit/s, while the "BASE" refers to baseband signalling. The letter following the dash ("T" or "F") refers to the physical medium that carries the signal (twisted pair or fiber, respectively), while the last character ("X") refers to the used encoding method.
 
Small Formfactor Pluggable (SFP)
 
The small form-factor pluggable (SFP) is a compact, hot-pluggable transceiver used for both telecommunication and data communications applications. The form factor and electrical interface are specified by a multi-source agreement (MSA) under the auspices of the SFF Committee. It is a popular industry format jointly developed and supported by many network component vendors. The SFP interfaces a network device (a switch, router, media converter or similar device) to a fiber optic or copper networking cable.
 
100BASE-TX SFP Transceiver
 
100BASE-TX is the predominant form of Fast Ethernet, and runs over two wire-pairs inside a category 5 or above cable. Like 10BASE-T, the active pairs in a standard connection are terminated on pins 1, 2, 3 and 6. Since a typical category 5 twisted pair cable contains 4 pairs, it can support two 100BASE-TX links with a wiring adaptor. Each network segment can have a maximum cabling distance of 100 metres (328 ft). In its typical configuration, 100BASE-TX uses one pair of twisted wires in each direction, providing 100 Mbit/s of throughput in each direction (full-duplex). BlueOptics© SFP 1000BASE-T, 100M, Copper Transceiver is one option for this category with RJ45 connector from CBO is designed for Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) high-speed applications of up to 1.25 gigabits per second over Cat5 Twisted Pair Cable.
 
 
100BASE-FX is a version of Fast Ethernet over optical fiber. This application uses a 1310nm near-infrared (NIR) light wavelength transmitted via two strands of optical fiber, one for receive (RX) and the other for transmit (TX). Maximum length is 412 metres. The BlueOptics© BO05A13602 SFP transceiver with LC duplex connector from CBO is designed for short-range multi-mode Fast Ethernet (FE), Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) or OC-3/STM1 SDH/SONET applications of up to 155 megabits per second.




What Ethernet Standards can be used with SFP+ ?

by www.fiber-mart.com

The enhanced small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) is an enhanced version of the SFP that supports data rates up to 16 Gbit/s.
 
The SFP+ specification was first published on May 9, 2006, and version 4.1 published on July 6, 2009. SFP+ supports 8 Gbit/s Fibre Channel, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and Optical Transport Network standard OTU2. It is a popular industry format supported by many network component vendors.
 
SFP+ connectivity are the most flexible and scalable Ethernet adapters for today’s demanding data center environments. The escalating deployments of servers with multi-core processors and demanding applications such as high performance computing (HPC), database clusters, and video-on-demand are the types of applications driving the need for 10-gigabit connections.
 
10 Gbit/s SFP+ modules are exactly the same dimensions as regular SFPs, allowing the equipment manufacturer to re-use existing physical designs for 24 and 48-port switches and modular line cards.
 
Although the SFP+ standard does not include mention of 16G Fibre Channel it can be used at this speed. Besides the data rate, the big difference between 8G Fibre Channel and 16G Fibre Channel is the encoding method. 64b/66b encoding used for 16G is a more efficient encoding mechanism than 8b/10b used for 8G, and allows for the data rate to double without doubling the line rate. The result is the 14.025 Gbit/s line rate for 16G Fibre Channel.
 
Like previous versions of Ethernet, 10GbE medium can be either copper or optical fiber cabling.  However, because of its bandwidth requirements, higher-grade copper cables are required: category 6a or Class F/Category 7 cables for lengths up to 100 meters. The 10 Gigabit Ethernet standard encompasses a number of different physical layer (PHY) standards.
 
SFP+ modules do only optical to electrical conversion, no clock and data recovery, putting a higher burden on the host's channel equalization. SFP+ modules share a common physical form factor with legacy SFP modules,
 
Select the appropriate transceiver to provide the required reach. Depending on the product, you can obtain SFP+ transceivers for cable distances of up to 15 meters (m), 400 m, 10 kilometers (km), 40 km, and 70 km. Alternatively, you can use a direct attach cable.
 
PHY TYPE
 
REACH
 
10GBASE-SR
 
Up to 300m link length with 2000 MHz*km MMF (OM3). Optical interoperability with 10GBASE-SRL
 
10GBASE-SRL
 
Up to 100m link length with 2000 MHz*km MMF (OM3). Optical interoperability with 10GBASE-SR
 
10GBASE-LRM
 
Up to 220m link length with 50 μm or 62.5 μm MMF links
 
10GBASE-LR
 
Up to 10km link length on standard single-mode fiber (SMF, G.652)
 
10GBASE-CR
 
Pre-terminated twin-ax copper cables with link lengths of 1m, 2m, 3m and 5m (SFP+ to SFP+ or QSFP to 4 x SFP+)
 
Bi-Directional Single Strand
 
Unlike previous Ethernet standards, 10 Gigabit Ethernet defines only full duplex point-to-point links which are generally connected by network switches; shared-medium CSMA/CD operation has not been carried over from the previous generations Ethernet standards. Half duplex operation and repeater hubs do not exist in 10GbE.
 
Multiple vendors have introduced single strand, bi-directional 10 Gbit/s optics capable of a single-mode fiber connection functionally equivalent to 10GBASE-LR or -ER, but using a single strand of fiber optic cable. Analogous to 1000BASE-BX10, this is accomplished using a passive prism inside each optical transceiver and a matched pair of transceivers, using a pair of wavelengths such as 1310 nm / 1490 nm or 1490 nm / 1550 nm. Modules are available in varying transmit powers and reach distances ranging from 10 to 80 km.




Should I use compatible SFP or SFP+?

by www.fiber-mart.com

SFP - Small Form-Factor Pluggable Module
 
SFP, small form-factor pluggable for short, is a compact, hot-pluggable transceiver module used for both telecommunication and data communications applications. SFP transceiver can be regarded as the upgrade version of GBIC module. SFP most often used for Fast Ethernet of Gigabit Ethernet applications. They are efficiently supporting speeds up to 4.25 Gbps.
 
The SFP transceiver is not standardized by any official standards body, but rather is specified by a multi-source agreement (MSA) among competing manufacturers.
 
SFP + - Small Form-Factor Pluggable Module
SFP+ is an enhanced version of the SFP that supports data rates up to 16 Gbps. SFP+ supports 8 Gbit/s Fibre Channel, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and Optical Transport Network standard OTU2. It is a popular industry format supported by many network component vendors. Although the SFP+ standard does not include mention of 16G Fibre Channel it can be used at this speed. Besides the data rate, the big difference between 8G Fibre Channel and 16G Fibre Channel is the encoding method. 64b/66b encoding used for 16G is a more efficient encoding mechanism than 8b/10b used for 8G, and allows for the data rate to double without doubling the line rate. The result is the 14.025 Gbit/s line rate for 16G Fibre Channel.
 
Should I use compatible SFP or SFP+ ? YES ! Why not ?
Many manufacturers restrict their devices to accept only original SFP modules of the same brand, as identified by their vendor ID. Due to sometimes significant price differences between original and generic or compatible modules, there is a large market of "compatible" or "third party" modules that are programmed to show the appropriate vendor.  Third-party SFP manufacturers have introduced SFPs with "blank" programmable EEPROMs which may be reprogrammed to match any vendor ID. When it is plugged into a Catalyst's SFP port the first time, the Catalyst queries this chip for its credentials. If it's not Cisco, your Cisco Catalyst switches would be configured by default not to work with the 3rd party (non-Cisco) SFPs, so the Catalyst would automatically shut the port down entirely.
 
Cisco wants their customers buying only Cisco hardware, which is -to say the least- more expensive than anyone else on the market. They make their own optical transceivers, and try very hard to convince buyers that only official Cisco hardware will work. Since SFPs aren't overseen by a central standards body -unlike WiFi, for example- there's no one around to tell Cisco not to do it. The primary benefit is the cost savings. The difference in price often exceeds 80 percent or more. Because transceiver costs are a significant part of the total system cost, it is important for designers to minimize these costs.
 
Warranty period
Of course, the other concern is the warranty. Most manufacturers offer short-term warranties, but consider buying from a vendor that throws longer service and support terms into the deal. A quality third party SFP should be able to provide years of performance, and be able to move across several pieces of hardware as your needs change over the years
 
Testing & Verification
There are methods to test and verify the 3rd-party transceiver modules, but it’s not always as easy as it seems. We can conduct some of the following tests.
 
Test for an Acceptable Bit-Error Ratio
Test to Determine Interoperability With a Worst-Case Transmitter
Determine the Minimal Power Level & Jitter Level
Try Performing the Optical Eye-Mask Tests
Verify Compliance With Multiple Samples
Know About Instrumentation Effects
 
BlueOptics high availability SFP+ Transceivers meet or exceed industrial standards, such as CE and RoHS as well as the regulations of the FCC. Through continuous monitoring before, during and after the production process, according to ISO9001, CBO reaches a steady quality of each BlueOptics SFP+ Transceiver.  Another feature available when purchasing from CBO-TEchnology is the telephone support call. If you run into trouble with your unit, you can get in touch with our support center for help.
 
If you're still hesitant about trying compatible optics from a third party manufacturer, the best way to ensure that you're getting a reliable product at a good deal is to choose us as a vendor you trust, as we have  a proven track record of quality products and great customer service. Ask us to send you samples to test to your specifications to find out whether the units live up to your standards, and get your network running without unnecessarily straining your budget.





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